The suits, filed in California Superior Court, seek compensatory and punitive damages and other remedies for the ongoing harm that oil, gas and coal cause by contributing to global warming and sea level rise. A 2009 Pacific Institute study calculated that San Mateo has more property and people at risk from sea level rise than any California county, while in Marin more than 12,000 homes, businesses and institutions, with an assessed value of $16 billion could be at risk from tides and surge flooding by the end of the century. The suits claim that the companies have known about the dangers posed by greenhouse gases for nearly fifty years and sought to conceal them from the public and encourage the use of fossil fuels while protecting the companies’ own assets and developing plans to profit from a warmer world. According to some legal experts, the suits may succeed where other efforts to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for climate change damage have failed, thanks to advances in climate science and recent revelations about what the companies knew about global warming and when they knew it. CHT

Simultaneous lawsuits filed against 37 fossil fuel companies by Marin and San Mateo Counties, along with the City of Imperial Beach, over sea level rise may open new front in climate battle.

 The suits, filed in California Superior Court, seek compensatory and punitive damages and other remedies for the ongoing harm that oil, gas and coal cause by contributing to global warming and sea level rise. A 2009 Pacific Institute study calculated that San Mateo has more property and people at risk from sea level rise than any California county, while in Marin more than 12,000 homes, businesses and institutions, with an assessed value of $16 billion could be at risk from tides and surge flooding by the end of the century. The suits claim that the companies have known about the dangers posed by greenhouse gases for nearly fifty years and sought to conceal them from the public and encourage the use of fossil fuels while protecting the companies’ own assets and developing plans to profit from a warmer world. According to some legal experts, the suits may succeed where other efforts to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for climate change damage have failed, thanks to advances in climate science and recent revelations about what the companies knew about global warming and when they knew it. CHT