“We are on track to complete the levees and transition zones next year so we can breach into the slough and restore the area to tidal action,” says Jim Levine, managing partner of Montezuma Wetlands LLC, which owns the property. The breach of the first major restoration area is planned for December 2019. This phase of the multi-phase project will restore 600 acres of previously subsided shoreline on the eastern edge of Suisun Bay to tidal, seasonal and some sub-tidal habitat. “A lot of threatened and endangered species habitat is going to be provided just by Phase One of this really large effort,” says the Coastal Conservancy’s Laura Cholodenko. The swift progress follows nearly two decades of preparation, during which Montezuma Wetlands has been using sediment from the Port of Oakland and other dredging projects to return the area to tidal elevations. The $1.6 million Restoration Authority grant will provide funding for final grading of site and some levee enhancement, including the creation of ecotones to provide refuge for species during high tides. Montezuma owns a total of 3600 acres in the area, of which roughly half are planned for restoration in the coming years. CHT

Pearls in the ocean of information that our reporters didn’t want you to miss
Photo courtesy of Montezuma Wetlands LLC
 

Just months after becoming the first project awarded Measure AA funding, the first phase of tidal breaching at the Montezuma Wetlands restoration project will be two-thirds complete by the end of November. “We are on track to complete the levees and transition zones next year so we can breach into the slough and restore the area to tidal action,” says Jim Levine, managing partner of Montezuma Wetlands LLC, which owns the property. The breach of the first major restoration area is planned for December 2019. This phase of the multi-phase project will restore 600 acres of previously subsided shoreline on the eastern edge of Suisun Bay to tidal, seasonal and some sub-tidal habitat. “A lot of threatened and endangered species habitat is going to be provided just by Phase One of this really large effort,” says the Coastal Conservancy’s Laura Cholodenko. The swift progress follows nearly two decades of preparation, during which Montezuma Wetlands has been using sediment from the Port of Oakland and other dredging projects to return the area to tidal elevations. The $1.6 million Restoration Authority grant will provide funding for final grading of site and some levee enhancement, including the creation of ecotones to provide refuge for species during high tides. Montezuma owns a total of 3600 acres in the area, of which roughly half are planned for restoration in the coming years. CHT

About the author

Cariad Hayes Thronson covers legal and political issues for Estuary News. She has served on the staffs of several national publications, including The American Lawyer. She is a long-time contributor to Estuary News, and some years ago served as its assistant editor. She lives in San Mateo with her husband and two children.