By Michael Hunter Adamson

“Follow the birds,” says Ryan Bartling of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, “If you want to find the herring spawns, they’ll do it for you.” At the conclusion of the 2017-18 Pacific herring run, Bartling is confident that data collected from spawns across the San Francisco Bay will show herring numbers consistent with the year before, if not slightly increased. While the fishery may no longer be an economic powerhouse, the herring continue to return for those who seek them.

 

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Hopeful Outlook for Pacific Herring

By Michael Hunter Adamson

“Follow the birds,” says Ryan Bartling of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, “If you want to find the herring spawns, they’ll do it for you.” At the conclusion of the 2017-18 Pacific herring run, Bartling is confident that data collected from spawns across the San Francisco Bay will show herring numbers consistent with the year before, if not slightly increased. While the fishery may no longer be an economic powerhouse, the herring continue to return for those who seek them.

 

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About the author

Michael Hunter Adamson was born and partly raised in the Bay Area and spent his childhood balancing adventure with mischief. As an equally irresponsible adult he has worked for The Nature Conservancy, the arts and education nonprofit NaNoWriMo, taught English in Madrid-based High School equivalent, and volunteers with The Marine Mammal Center. As a writer for Estuary and AcclimateWest, Michael employs his love for nature and his interest in people to help tell the unfolding story of the living Earth.