By Robin Meadows

The arts can reach people in ways that facts and figures can’t. “Even if you have the knowledge, there’s an element of activation,” says Nicole Ardoin, a Stanford researcher studying environmental behavior. “Art speaks to people on an emotional level that can create a spark.” This is particularly true for climate change, and is the impetus for many Bay Area artists. Consider Fairfax-based sculptors Daniel McCormick and Mary O’Brien and their work titled Submerged. It’s an array of rounded cones designed to transform into an oyster reef. Or San Francisco-based Reneé Rhodes, who plans to choreograph dancers to mimic the geologic processes in sand cycle landscapes.

 

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The Art of Environmental Restoration

By Robin Meadows

The arts can reach people in ways that facts and figures can’t. “Even if you have the knowledge, there’s an element of activation,” says Nicole Ardoin, a Stanford researcher studying environmental behavior. “Art speaks to people on an emotional level that can create a spark.” This is particularly true for climate change, and is the impetus for many Bay Area artists. Consider Fairfax-based sculptors Daniel McCormick and Mary O’Brien and their work titled Submerged. It’s an array of rounded cones designed to transform into an oyster reef. Or San Francisco-based Reneé Rhodes, who plans to choreograph dancers to mimic the geologic processes in sand cycle landscapes.

 

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About the author

Robin Meadows is an independent science journalist in the San Francisco Bay Area. She covers water and climate change adaptation for Estuary News, is the water reporter for the Bay Area Monitor, and contributes to Bay Nature, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, PLOS Research News and Water Deeply. Robin also enjoys hiking and photography.